The Whitley Pump

The view from Katesgrove Hill

Tag: Specials (page 1 of 9)

Twinned with the Whitley Pump – the Funchal drinking fountain by Max Römer

Fontanario da Imperatriz – 1844

Funchal, on the island of Madeira, has more than enough drinking fountains for a dedicated tourist trail. If we had to pick one that really stands out for twinning, it would have to be this one which is situated up on the hill just north of the casino. There is also a very circuituous and tenuous link back to the Whitley Pump.

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Katesgrove’s link with carols in the trenches in 1914

25 December 1914 Archibald Buchanan-Dunlop (left), Captain M. B. G. Copeman (centre), and Captain W. C. Wilson (right) in the trenches at La Grande Flamengrie. Image courtesy Robin Buchanan-Dunlop

Major Archibald Henry Buchanan-Dunlop of Whitley Rise was pictured in the Berkshire Chronicle of 8 January 1915 beneath the headline “Major who sang carols between the trenches”. A short paragraph beneath reported that he was one of the “moving spirits” in the Christmas truce between British and German troops on the Western Front [ref 1].

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Twinned with the Whitley Pump – Walton Well drinking fountain

Walton Well drinking fountain

In Jericho, Oxford’s answer to Katesgrove, you will find Walton Well drinking fountain. It is situated at the junction of Walton Well Road with Southmoor Road and Longworth Road and right opposite the site of the former Eagle Ironworks. There had been a well, a spring and a ford at this point until the 1880s, but that had been filled in. Former Oxford Mayor William Ward presented the fountain in 1885.

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Village Pumps by Richard Williams

Richard K Williams book Village Pumps is a concise summary of the history, technology and terminology of water pumps. The book is richly illustrated with diagrams and photographs and will be of interest to every Whitley Pump reader.

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Whitley garden wildlife in October and November

Mouse

Mouse. Photo © David Turner

My Whitley garden was burgled in September, leaving me with very little equipment with which to record wildlife. Fortunately, I still have one working camera which I move about the garden each week and, of course, I have my trusted Fuji camera permanently strapped to me!

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The Four Horseshoes public house and its place in Reading’s political history

The Four Horseshoes public house at the corner of Basingstoke Road and Long Barn Lane was an ancient hostelry originally known as the Long Barn. In the 1820s, it was at the centre of a libel case involving tenant James Leach and Reading’s brewing and political elites.

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Whitley garden wildlife in October: the vandalism special

David Turner’s monthly diary of Whitley wildlife was interrupted one night in September when somebody stole some of his garden monitoring equipment and vandalised the rest. Nobody was hurt, and both Bubbles the hedgehog and the fox family were left unmolested, but there could be no further wildlife photographs from mid-September.

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How Katesgrove ironworks contributed to the Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology

By Evelyn Williams and Adam Harrington.

2008.99.0163

Limestone figurine of a horse 750- 650 BC, Cypro-archaic I period.
Image courtesy of the Ure Museum (c) University of Reading.

The Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology on Reading University’s Whiteknights campus houses many ancient Cypriot artefacts collected by Ellen Barry at the end of the nineteenth century. Ellen Barry was the daughter of William Exall, a partner at the former Katesgrove Lane ironworks Barrett, Exall and Andrewes. Her mother was Frances Mary Andrewes, who was a sister of another partner in the same business, Charles Andrewes.

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Whitley garden wildlife in September

Hummingbird hawk moth

Hummingbird hawk moth. Photo © David Turner

Temperatures reached a balmy 29ºC for a few days in September, although the average temperature was 19ºC. The weather dramatically changed on 22 September; it became very wet and remained wet but mild right through October.

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A Panegyric on Martijn Gilbert, Ex-CEO of Reading Buses

‘Destination Zoë Andrews’ at the Reading Buses July 2018 open day. Photo (c) Zoë Andrews

I hadn’t lived in Reading properly since 2010 when I moved back in 2015. Throughout university in Cardiff, I regularly came home. One of the comfort blankets of home was the buses. I lived in both Cardiff and Bristol between my spells of being back in the ‘ding, and I can tell you something categorically: we have a very good bus service in comparison to elsewhere.

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Refusenik

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Whitley garden wildlife in July and August

Fox vixen with a rat. Picture (c) David Turner

The late summer weather in my Whitley garden varied from warm to very hot indeed, with the occasional very wet day. The sun helped increase the numbers of butterflies, bees, insects and moths, of course. One of my photograph highlights for July was the vixen fox with a huge rat, striking a superb pose.

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Whitley garden wildlife in June

Jay with a monkeynut. Photo (c) David Turner

June was a very warm month; during the rainy days of mid-month the temperatures still held at a warm 20°C. On 1 June, the temperature reached 28°C and was the hottest day of the year so far.

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Twinned with the Whitley Pump – Sandwich in Bloom

Sandwich in Bloom with pump behind

We struggled to read the maker’s name on this water pump in Kent which was almost hidden behind the ‘Sandwich in Bloom’ bicycle. Google came to the rescue (and more).

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A lifetime of music in Reading, with Fiona Talkington

Fiona Talkington on New Road, Redlands, in January 2019

The BBC Radio 3 broadcaster, writer, Norwegian arts enthusiast and Reading Fringe Festival curator Fiona Talkington still lives near Christchurch Green, Reading, in the home in which she grew up. Her house was, as it should be for a music presenter, almost knee-deep in CDs, although Fiona did confide that the CDs also met an insulating role where they lined inside external walls.

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Whitley garden wildlife in May

Lucky escape for the squirrel. Photo: David Turner

May was a very bad month for predation in my garden, with cats catching blackbirds, pigeons, starlings and squirrels. I do get annoyed, but I would never harm a cat; it’s just a natural instinct on their part, and there is very little I can do to stop it.

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A Saturday afternoon trip to Fleet on the number seven bus

The number 7 ‘Tiger’ service from Reading to Fleet in Hampshire is a relatively new addition to Reading Buses’ services. Highlights of the trip include travelling in the bus lane across the middle of the roundabout at Junction 11 of the M4, bouncing through Mary Mitford’s village of Three Mile Cross and, when you get to Fleet, there is an ironmongers and an ice cream parlour!

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Whitley garden wildlife in April

A Whitley fox. Photo :David Turner

April temperatures in my Whitley garden reached as high as 30ºC and as low as -5ºC, the hottest and coldest ever recorded for that month; the average temperature for the month was 17ºC. We also experienced an afternoon hail storm at the beginning of the month that briefly covered the garden in what looked like snow.

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Whitley garden wildlife in March

Male sparrowhawk. Photo: David Turner

March weather was a mix of every type of condition we could experience. We endured storm Freya for the first three days of the month, which consisted of extremely strong winds and rain, although the temperature stayed reasonably mild throughout.

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California (Katesgrove) Dreaming…

Hidden behind an ornate brick frontage on Milman Road stands a quietly growing giant. This giant is a tree, and not just any tree, but a Californian Redwood. It is the only tree on the street with a preservation order, thanks to efforts by local legends John and Edna Tuggey.

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